How to exercise consistently, even if you don't feel like it | M-Unity
Menu

How to exercise consistently, even if you don’t feel like it

“Each workout is like a brick in a building, and every time you go in there and do a half-ass workout, you’re not laying a brick down. You will never build your ‘house’.“

“Darnit, I didn’t make it to the gym today! I’ll go tomorrow!”

“I’ll do my workout once I’m done!”

That makes a few months, if not years in a row. Honestly, how to create a momentum and turn our intentions into action – that is something that most of us struggle with.

Finding that ‘one thing’ that will keep us going – that’s the holy grail of exercise. 

Sheer willpower doesn’t exist. 

Nike’s “Just do it” doesn’t cut it either. Besides, I prefer Puma’s slogan “Forever, Faster”

We are facing many obstacles like demanding jobs, family responsibilities, lack of energy, or a pure dislike of exercise.

There are relatively simple habits that can increase your odds in succeeding!

1. Look for instant gratification

This is the only time (!) I’m encouraging you to look for the short-term, immediate benefits. Unfortunately, we tend to be more motivated by immediate results (sigh) than the ones that seem far away.

I’m guilty of this as well. When I imagine that a sweaty session with ShauT helps me to cope better with screaming at my kiddos – that’s a sure way to get me going than the idea that exercise will prevent a heart attack!

Find your own immediate result. Is it a better mood? Better sleep? Better digestion? Better sex?

2. Set a specific and realistic winning goal

“I want to lose weight” – this is just a vague wish. There is no feeling to it. Be specific, and realistic, put your feelings into your goal. Make your goal achievable. I’d recommend you break down one big goal to smaller goals – the sense of achievement and success will keep the momentum going.

3. Prepare a game plan

As you know by now, I’m a big fan of planning. It gives me more freedom and time. Think of your workout as an important appointment. Schedule it and prepare for it!

Same way your goals should be realistic, so should be your planning! It’s always good to have a backup plan, as life can be unpredictable. 

4. Have fun

“Having fun” is not usually what my clients use to describe our session (although they do enjoy it). There are always easy ways to make your workout fun!

For example – try to find activities that you like – or at least don’t mind. 

Another example – you can turn exercise into a game. Nintendo’s Ring Fit Adventure is a great game that will have you sweat in no time! And it’s fun!

For me – it’s the music! Listening to music has been found to boost endurance and performance! According to Costas Karageorghis, a psychologist at London’s Brunel University and a leading expert on the link between music and physical activity, the optimum BPM (beats Per Minute) is 125 to 140! 

My music is pretty loud and always has words or messages that energize me and make me work harder! My go-to song? Warrior by Havana Brown When I hear this song – oh boy!

5. Find a workout buddy

Working out with a friend or taking a group fitness class – it can make the time pass by quickly. There are researches confirming that camaraderie can up your game! Besides, if you workout with people who are fitter or faster – it can motivate you to work harder!

6. Claim your reward

Ok, this is a big one. I use the “Commitment to myself” tool. It’s a piece of paper where I write down my goals, commit to it, I state my ‘why’ (why I want to achieve these goals) and how I am going to reward myself! I signed it with a date! My signature is ‘legally’ binding me to achieve my goals.

7. Fine-tune your attitude

Tell me the firs words that come to your mind when you hear the word  “exercise”.

Is it ‘dislike’? Or ‘torture’? ‘Pain’ perhaps? 

Too often people see exercise, and a healthy lifestyle in general, as something utterly unpleasant chore – something they should do but don’t really want to do.

Usually these negative associations come from an expectation of discomfort, pain or boredom. Failed attempt to lose weight or get stronger, leaner. Or from a fear of feeling self-conscious while working out. 

Mamy of my clients have unpleasant childhood memories of their PE classes – so they decided exercising is bad and painful.

I help my clients to replace these negative beliefs with positive ones. I show them how exercise and eating healthy enhances their life. Yes, instant gratification is one of the tools I use.

Bottom Line:

The key to any transformation is to move from seeing something that you have to do to something that you want to do!

This journey requires time and patience. But think about how you will feel physically and mentally stronger, more empowered, and in control of your life!

I know YOU CAN! Do you?